Örnólfur Eldon & Krõõt-Kärt Kaev
Örnólfur Eldon & Krõõt-Kärt Kaev
Composers
Krõõt-Kärt Kaev (*1992) and Örnólfur Eldon Þórsson (*1992) have been collaborating since 2017, doing concerts and composing music together as well as working on their own. Based in Hamburg, their philosophy of collaboration is to be completely involved in all of the works aspects during the composition process, avoiding any kind of hierarchy and splitting of tasks between the two of them. They both studied instrumental and electronic composition with Prof. Ming Tsao, Gordon Williamson, Daniel Moreira and Joachim Heintz at the Hochschule für Musik Theater und Medien in Hannover, Germany. Constantly discussing and questioning each other’s methods and ideas requires them to break out of their habits, rethink their creative process and to find a common ground where the integrity of the art work is of highest importance. The process has led them to discover new ways of expression in their music, which is entirely different from what they would normally find in their own works.

BAP The composition ‘bap’ for choir and electronics was commissioned by Prof. Frank Löhr to be written for the HMTM Konzertchor in Hannover. The premiere performance took place in the […]

BAP
The composition ‘bap’ for choir and electronics was commissioned by Prof. Frank Löhr to be written for the HMTM Konzertchor in Hannover. The premiere performance took place in the summer of 2017 in Christuskirche Hannover with a subsequent performance in the Hardehausen monastery. A revised version, omitting the electronics, was programmed in 2018 on the EARTH#SKY#SPACE festival in Hannover (conductor: Prof. Andreas Felber). The 3rd (and current) version was first performed in the summer of 2019, by a vocal octet with electronics, in the Sprengel Museum of Modern Art in Hannover.

In ‘bap’, the singers are divided into 8 groups that are amplified and the sound is processed before being sent to a corresponding loudspeaker. Any voice type of any gender may perform each of the vocal parts in the score, breaking away from the traditional hierarchies of western vocal music.